Triad Cures a Headache at Hospital in Springfield, Minnesota

Mayo Clinic Health Center Interior

Mayo Clinic developed gradually from the medical practice of a pioneer doctor, Dr. William Worrall Mayo, who settled in Rochester, Minn., in 1863. His dedication to medicine became a family tradition when his sons later joined him.That teamwork in medicine is carried out today by more than 55,000 doctors, nurses, scientists, students and allied health staff at Mayo Clinic locations in the Midwest, Arizona and Florida. The Mayo Clinic is the first and largest integrated not-for-profit medical practice in the world, employing more than 3,800 physicians and scientists and 50,900 allied health staff and spends over $500 million a year on research.

The Mayo Clinic Health System in Springfield, MN was established in 1958 and became a part of the Mayo Clinic Health System in January 1998.Springfield is a small town located in Southern Minnesota. So this clinic is very important to them.

It was clear that the clinic needed an upgrade, considering its long history. Quality critical access hospitals that attract and retain skilled health care professionals are vital to the quality of life in smaller towns. This multi-phase project transformed a 1950s hospital into a modern medical center. The architect devised a critical access hospital concept designed for efficiency, flexibility and patient-centered care. This included seamless integration of new construction with the existing facility, and was accomplished as funding became available.

The clinic still had the original boiler from the 1950’s that was too large and very inefficient. Fuel costs were high and maintenance a headache.

The project required replacing a single large boiler, but Triad was chosen because they wanted to incorporate a modular concept for efficiency reasons, yet needed dual fuel capabilities required for this hospital application.

Ultimately, three Series 1600 Hot Water Boilers were installed with a total input of 4,800,000 Btu’s firing on natural gas. The burners used were PowerFlame JR50’s with low/high/low firing. The entire system was controlled by a control panel utilizing outdoor reset and careful monitoring the building loop. This modular system is set to realize very strong efficiencies in the fall and spring shoulder seasons.

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