116 Year Old Historic Weatherford Hotel Installs TRIADs

This Arizona Gateway to the Wild West Remodels with Steam Boilers.

Weatherford Hotel Lobby

Back when Arizona was a territory and vigilantes ruled, John W. Weatherford arrived hereby horse and buggy with a grand vision for the West. Around the turn of the century, Weatherford threw open the doors of his grand hotel, doors that would welcome presidents and gunslingers alike to a civilized oasis in the dusty West.

Nearly 100 years ago, the local newspaper, The Coconino Sun, claimed the Weatherford to be “first class in every aspect”, a tradition and standard the owners continue to uphold. Since then, this fabulous building has housed Flagstaff’s first telephone exchange company, a number of restaurants, a theater, and a billiard hall. It has survived fire, harsh weather, two world wars and a planned demolition. In 1978 the hotel was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

The owner, Henry Taylor, a third-generation Arizona hotelier, has worked to restore, preserve and maintain the historic Weatherford Hotel for almost 40 years. After many years of work,he is pleased that the Weatherford is authentically restored back to its pioneer beginnings.

President Theodore Roosevelt, publisher William Randolf Hearst, and lawman Wyatt Earp were among the hotel’s guests. Thomas Moran spent many nights there completing sketches of the western landscape in the early 1900’s. His depictions of the wilderness moved Congress to preserve such places as the Grand Canyon and Yellowstone National Parks.

Cowboy author Zane Grey, a frequent visitor, wrote Call of the Canyon while staying at the Weatherford.

His early descriptions of the hotel lead the owner, Henry Taylor, to discover original fireplaces that had been covered with plaster and hidden in the walls.

The owners opted for Series 1600TriadSteam Boilers due to their modular setup, the reliability of steel, and the fully assembled, “packaged” nature that came ready to fit into the very tight space, with no sections to put together. Because it is in the National Register of Historic Places, the owners needed to be careful that no damage was done to the building while installing the equipment. So a compact size was very important.

Henry Taylor stated that “It has become something of our life’s work,this hotel. We enjoy sharing what we’ve managed with travelers and neighbors. But in the end it’s the history — the history of the place — that keeps us involved. We enjoy our position as caretakers of this grand old hotel, preserving it for the community, for Flagstaff, for the future.

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